Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High


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10 technologies that have dramatically changed the way we live

The assistant informed Bezos of the invitation, and told him that both days were open. Such a willful act of vanity felt like a bad omen. Walmart is the largest. It traffics more than a third of all retail products bought or sold online in the U. Critics say that Amazon, much like Google and Facebook, has grown too large and powerful to be trusted.

Company insiders were accustomed to complaints from rivals at book publishers or executives at big-box stores. Those attacks rarely felt personal. Amazon executives were also concerned about dramatic changes within the company. In , Amazon had roughly two hundred thousand employees. Since then, its workforce had nearly tripled. Bezos, now fifty-five, had transformed as well, from a pudgy bookseller with an elephant-seal laugh to a sleek, muscled mogul whose empire included a television-and-movie studio.

Bezos declined to be interviewed for this article. Still, they whispered, what if his flywheel has gone off track?

The notion of the flywheel—the heavy disk within a machine that, once spinning, pushes gears and production relentlessly forward—is venerated within Amazon, as Ian Freed learned on his first day of work, in He felt that every organization he advised failed to take advantage of all the opportunities created by the Internet. He moved to the West Coast, where he became an expert in streaming networks.

Then he joined Amazon, as a director of its fledgling mobile-services team. During an orientation that included a warehouse stint unloading boxes of shampoo and stocking shelves with toothpaste, he realized that people at the company saw things in a fundamentally different way.

Most firms have a mission statement that even the C. Amazon employees, Freed discovered, studied the Leadership Principles like Talmudic texts. During his first few years, he occasionally pulled colleagues, and even Bezos, aside to ask questions. Be stubborn on your vision but flexible on the details.

But Bezos urged his people to be adaptable. The Leadership Principles were never paraphrased; when a question over wording arose, the laminated cards were often whipped out. PowerPoint was discouraged. Product proposals had to be written out as six-page narratives—Bezos believed that storytelling forced critical thinking—accompanied by a mock press release.

Drugs 2.0: The web revolution that's changing how the world gets high by Mike Power – review

Meetings started with a period of silent reading, and each proposal concluded with a list of F. Tech companies are often profligate, but Amazon had an ethic of thrift. Freed learned to anticipate the eye rolls that greeted new employees who printed on just one side of paper, or the admonishment coming to anyone who wanted to book a business-class seat.

Whenever Amazon moved to new offices, Bezos had them furnished with cheap desks made from wooden doors. Whereas other tech companies supplied employees with an array of free meals and snacks, Amazon offered only coffee and bananas. When Amazon leaders joined the low-carb craze, they ended meetings debating the finer points of ketosis, and raced one another up the stairs. When the Kindle was launched, in , it sold out in less than six hours, and soon became one of the most popular gadgets of the past quarter century.

As Freed learned, it was also fine to stumble at Amazon, as long as the experience yielded strategic insight. Bezos had become enamored of a sophisticated display that approximated 3-D.

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Drugs 2.0, with Mike Power

For four years, Freed oversaw a group that grew to a thousand employees, and spent more than a hundred million dollars. But when the Amazon Fire Phone was released, in , it was a flop. So Freed and his team hired speech scientists and artificial-intelligence experts, and created new software that could comprehend someone from Louisiana as well as someone from Liverpool—and distinguish the babble of a toddler from parents talking with food in their mouths. Today, you can buy one for half that, and fifty million homes have them. Identifying and building flywheels became second nature to Freed.


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They reminded Bezos that, with existing streaming devices, searching for content was difficult. The flywheel began spinning. If Amazon sold a streaming device, it could collect more data on popular shows; if Amazon had that data, it could begin profitably producing its own premium movies and television series; if Amazon made that content free for Prime members—customers who already paid ninety-nine dollars per year for two-day delivery—then more people would sign up for Prime; if more people signed up for Prime, the company would have greater leverage in negotiating with UPS and FedEx; lower shipping costs would mean bigger profits every time Amazon sold anything on its site.

The Amazon Fire TV, as the device was named, soon became one of the most popular streaming devices on the planet. Although Freed was thriving at Amazon, he could see that there was something dizzying about its flywheel mentality. Companies enrolled in Fulfillment by Amazon often appeared in the Buy Box, the top search listing on Amazon. To participate, many venders had to pay about two dollars per item. They also had to let Bezos collect valuable data on which products were becoming popular and which companies were having trouble satisfying demand.

Today, Amazon. Scott Needham, whose company, BuyBoxer, sells about seventy thousand products on Amazon, ranging from toys to sporting goods, paid the company roughly twenty million dollars in fees last year. House of Representatives and the European Union began scrutinizing Fulfillment by Amazon and similar programs, out of concern that they impede competition. Many employees carry handheld scanners that deliver a constant stream of instructions, such as a countdown clock detailing how many seconds remain until the next item must be plucked from a shelf.

Workers can walk more than fifteen miles a day, and their breaks, including trips to the bathroom, are brief and closely measured. For years, some Amazon warehouses lacked sufficient air-conditioning; this changed only after reports emerged , in , of workers passing out and requiring emergency medical treatment for heat-related problems.

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If you get four writeups within ninety days for falling below the expected productivity rate, you will be fired. When Safiyo Mohamed moved from Somalia to Minnesota, in , at the age of twenty-two, she found work at the Shakopee warehouse, sorting products and moving boxes on and off conveyors. The job was taxing and the pressure relentless, she said. One day, when she picked up a heavy box, she tore an intervertebral disk in her back. A doctor told her that the injury was pinching a nerve, and that the discomfort might never abate.


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She quit Amazon, and got an office job that allows her to pause, or stretch, when her back hurts. I will have this forever because of them. The lack of female representation is a sensitive topic at the company. No one works at Amazon—at least, in corporate—unless they want to. Amazon argues that criticisms of working conditions in its warehouses are unfair. Many Amazon executives have become defensive about the fact that even centrist politicians like Joe Biden see the company as a symbol of capitalism gone awry.

Marc T. Law, University of Vermont

Amazon has always been unabashed about being a cutthroat competitor. When the company started, in , with fewer than a dozen employees, Bezos considered naming it Relentless. The company still owns the URL for relentless. Amazonians know that outsiders want them to change, but listening to outsiders is not one of the Leadership Principles. Someone prepared the carcass; another person cut the left haunch; another was responsible for incisions along the shoulder. The knives never stopped moving as the animals sped through the plant.

When Ford managers heard about the meatpacking plant, they began work on another major innovation: the mechanized assembly line. Sloan began working as an executive at a much smaller company, General Motors. He loved making money—and figuring out how to manage people in order to make profits grow faster. Once installed at G. It was the first org chart of its kind. Soon, the company had standard procedures for budgeting, hiring, firing, prototyping, promoting, and resolving disputes. Within this rigid framework, executives were given the freedom to be creative; G.

When Sloan joined the company, G. In , G.

Sloan launched a sophisticated corporate polling division—another first—that uncovered customer tastes that other companies had overlooked; the R. Silicon Valley is filled with product companies. Amazon is a process company. Last year, it collected a hundred and twenty-two billion dollars from online retail sales, and another forty-two billion by helping other firms sell and ship their own goods. The company collected twenty-six billion dollars from its Web-services division, which has little to do with selling things to consumers, and fourteen billion more from people who sign up for such subscription services as Amazon Prime or Kindle Unlimited.

Amazon is estimated to have taken in hundreds of millions of dollars from selling the Echo. Seventeen billion came from sales at such brick-and-mortar stores as Whole Foods. No other tech company does as many unrelated things, on such a scale, as Amazon.

Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High
Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High
Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High
Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High
Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High
Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High Drugs 2.0: The Web Revolution Thats Changing How the World Gets High

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